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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Jun;22(6):1162-6. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0032. Epub 2013 Apr 11.

Meat consumption and the risk of Barrett's esophagus in a large Dutch cohort.

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1
Departments of Epidemiology and Pathology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. andras.keszei@maastrichtuniversity.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Increasing meat intake and its possible role in the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma raises the question whether meat consumption is associated with the premalignant lesion, Barrett's esophagus.

METHODS:

Associations between the risk of Barrett's esophagus and meat consumption, intake of N-nitrosodimethylamine, nitrite, and heme iron were examined in the Netherlands Cohort Study among 120,852 subjects aged 55 to 69 years in 1986. Exposure was measured on the basis of a 150-item food frequency questionnaire. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 447 Barrett's esophagus cases with specialized intestinal metaplasia and 3,919 subcohort members were analyzed in a case-cohort design.

RESULTS:

There was no association of any of the examined exposures with Barrett's risk in men or women. Results were similar in age-adjusted and fully adjusted models and in models excluding the first two years of follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results do not support a role of meat consumption and N-nitrosation related factors in the development of Barrett's esophagus.

IMPACT:

The possible causal association between red meat intake and esophageal adenocarcinoma is unlikely to be mediated by mechanisms through the development of Barrett's esophagus.

PMID:
23580699
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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