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PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e59672. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059672. Epub 2013 Apr 5.

Influence of erythropoietin on cognitive performance during experimental hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a randomized cross-over trial.

Author information

1
Endocrinology Section, Department of Cardiology, Nephrology and Endocrinology, Hillerød Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. pelk@hih.regionh.dk

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The incidence of severe hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes has not decreased over the past decades. New treatment modalities minimizing the risk of hypoglycemic episodes and attenuating hypoglycemic cognitive dysfunction are needed. We studied if treatment with the neuroprotective hormone erythropoietin (EPO) enhances cognitive function during hypoglycemia.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Eleven patients with type 1 diabetes, hypoglycemia unawareness and recurrent severe hypoglycemia completed the study. In a double-blind, randomized, balanced, cross-over study using clamped hypoglycemia they were treated with 40,000 IU of EPO or placebo administered intravenously six days before the two experiments. Cognitive function (primary endpoint), hypoglycemic symptoms, and counter-regulatory hormonal response were recorded.

RESULTS:

Compared with placebo, EPO treatment was associated with a significant reduction in errors in the most complex reaction time task (-4.7 (-8.1 to -1.3), p = 0.01) and a less reaction time prolongation (-66 (-117 to -16) msec, p = 0.02). EPO treatment did not change performance in other measures of cognition. Hypoglycemic symptoms, EEG-changes, and counter-regulatory hormone concentrations did not differ between EPO and placebo treatment.

CONCLUSION:

In patients with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness, treatment with EPO is associated with a beneficial effect on cognitive function in a complex reaction time task assessing sustained attention/working memory. Hypoglycemic symptoms and hormonal responses were not changed by EPO treatment.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00615368.

PMID:
23577069
PMCID:
PMC3618268
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0059672
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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