Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nat Commun. 2013;4:1682. doi: 10.1038/ncomms2673.

A role for Piezo2 in EPAC1-dependent mechanical allodynia.

Author information

1
Molecular Nociception Group, Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. N.Eijkelkamp@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

Aberrant mechanosensation has an important role in different pain states. Here we show that Epac1 (cyclic AMP sensor) potentiation of Piezo2-mediated mechanotransduction contributes to mechanical allodynia. Dorsal root ganglia Epac1 mRNA levels increase during neuropathic pain, and nerve damage-induced allodynia is reduced in Epac1-/- mice. The Epac-selective cAMP analogue 8-pCPT sensitizes mechanically evoked currents in sensory neurons. Human Piezo2 produces large mechanically gated currents that are enhanced by the activation of the cAMP-sensor Epac1 or cytosolic calcium but are unaffected by protein kinase C or protein kinase A and depend on the integrity of the cytoskeleton. In vivo, 8-pCPT induces long-lasting allodynia that is prevented by the knockdown of Epac1 and attenuated by mouse Piezo2 knockdown. Piezo2 knockdown also enhanced thresholds for light touch. Finally, 8-pCPT sensitizes responses to innocuous mechanical stimuli without changing the electrical excitability of sensory fibres. These data indicate that the Epac1-Piezo2 axis has a role in the development of mechanical allodynia during neuropathic pain.

PMID:
23575686
PMCID:
PMC3644070
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms2673
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center