Format

Send to

Choose Destination
World J Urol. 2013 Oct;31(5):1073-80. doi: 10.1007/s00345-013-1071-x. Epub 2013 Apr 9.

Gender differences in clinicopathological features and survival in surgically treated patients with renal cell carcinoma: an analysis of the multicenter CORONA database.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, St. Elisabeth Hospital Straubing, Straubing, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate gender differences in clinicopathological features and to analyze the prognostic impact of gender in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients undergoing surgery.

METHODS:

A total of 6,234 patients (eleven centers; Europe and USA) treated by radical or partial nephrectomy were included in this retrospective study (median follow-up 59 months; IQR 30-106). Gender differences in clinicopathological parameters were assessed. Multivariable Cox regression models were applied to determine the influence of parameters on disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS).

RESULTS:

A total of 3,751 patients of the study group were male patients (60.2 %), who were significantly younger at diagnosis and received more frequently NSS than women. Significantly, more often high-grade tumors and simultaneous metastasis were present in men. Whereas tumor size and pTN stages did not differ between genders, clear-cell and chromophobe RCC was diagnosed less frequently, but papillary RCC more often in men. Gender also independently influenced DSS (HR 0.75, p < 0.001) and OS (HR 0.80, p < 0.001) with a benefit for women. However, inclusion of gender in multivariable models did not significantly gain predictive accuracies (PA) for DSS (0.868-0.870, p = 0.628) and OS (0.775-0.777, p = 0.522). Furthermore, no significantly different DSS and OS rates were found in patients undergoing NSS.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates important gender differences in clinicopathological features and outcome of RCC patients with improved DSS and OS for women compared to men, even if solely patients with clear-cell RCC or M0-stage are taken into evaluation. However, inclusion of gender in multivariable models does not significantly gain PA of multivariable models.

PMID:
23568445
DOI:
10.1007/s00345-013-1071-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center