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J Couns Psychol. 2013 Jul;60(3):367-78. doi: 10.1037/a0032551. Epub 2013 Apr 8.

Moderation effects of perfectionism and discrimination on interpersonal factors and suicide ideation.

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  • 1Department of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA.wangk@missouri.edu

Abstract

This study examined the moderating effects of 3 risk factors-perfectionistic personal discrepancy, perfectionistic family discrepancy, and discrimination-on the associations between interpersonal risk factors (i.e., perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness) and suicide ideation in a sample of 466 Asian international students studying in the United States. We focused specifically on perceived discrimination and maladaptive perfectionism as moderating risk factors to Joiner's (2005) interpersonal theory of suicidal behavior. We incorporated both personal and family discrepancy as indicators of maladaptive perfectionism. Personal discrepancy refers to the tendency of individuals to perceive that they failed to meet their own standards, whereas family discrepancy refers to individuals' tendency to perceive that they failed to meet their families' standards. Results highlight the significance of studying this overlooked population in the suicide ideation literature. Maladaptive perfectionism (i.e., personal and family discrepancy) as well as discrimination were found to be positively associated with suicide ideation. Moreover, family discrepancy and perceived discrimination were found to intensify the associations between interpersonal risk factors (i.e., perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness) and suicide ideation. These findings underscore the importance of considering interpersonal factors in addressing suicidal risks with populations from collectivistic cultures. Research and clinical implications are also addressed.

PMID:
23566062
DOI:
10.1037/a0032551
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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