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Am J Hypertens. 2013 Jul;26(7):903-11. doi: 10.1093/ajh/hpt044. Epub 2013 Apr 4.

Sleep duration and risk for hypertension in women: results from the nurses' health study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. jeg64@columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acute sleep restriction has been shown to increase blood pressure and sympathetic nervous system activity.

METHODS:

We investigated the relationships between sleep duration and hypertension among women whose sleep durations were self-reported in 1986 (n = 82,130) and 2000 (n = 71,658) in the Nurses' Health Study I (NHS-I) and in 2001 (n = 84,674) in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS-II).

RESULTS:

After controlling for multiple risk factors in logistic regression models, the prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher among women in all 3 groups who slept ≤5 hours (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14-1.25) per night compared with 7 hours. In prospective analyses using Cox regression shorter sleep duration of ≤5 hours per night was significantly associated with a higher incidence of hypertension only in younger women (hazard ratio [HR] =1.20, 95% CI = 1.09-1.31 for those aged <50 years; HR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.00-1.23 for those aged 50-59 years). In both prevalent and incident analyses, results were consistent with obesity acting as a partial mediator. Results were not consistent with diabetes or hypercholesterolemia acting as mediators or with shift work, snoring, menopause, or postmenopausal hormone therapy acting as effect modifiers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sufficient sleep could represent a lifestyle practice worthy of investigation as an approach to reduce hypertension incidence and prevalence.

KEYWORDS:

blood pressure; circadian rhythm; epidemiology; hypertension; obesity; sleep

PMID:
23564028
PMCID:
PMC3731821
DOI:
10.1093/ajh/hpt044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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