Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Apr;121(4):488-93. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1205736. Epub 2013 Jan 16.

Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in association with air pollution at levels below current air quality guidelines.

Author information

1
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Ebba.Malmqvist@med.lu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several studies have estimated associations between air pollution and birth outcomes, but few have evaluated potential effects on pregnancy complications.

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated whether low-level exposure to air pollution is associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia.

METHODS:

High-quality registry information on 81,110 singleton pregnancy outcomes in southern Sweden during 1999-2005 was linked to individual-level exposure estimates with high spatial resolution. Modeled exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx), expressed as mean concentrations per trimester, and proximity to roads of different traffic densities were used as proxy indicators of exposure to combustion-related air pollution. The data were analyzed by logistic regression, with and without adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of gestational diabetes increased with each NOx quartile, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.03) for the highest (> 22.7 µg/m3) compared with the lowest quartile (2.5-8.9 µg/m3) of exposure during the second trimester. The adjusted OR for acquiring preeclampsia after exposure during the third trimester was 1.51 (1.32, 1.73) in the highest quartile of NOx compared with the lowest. Both outcomes were associated with high traffic density, but ORs were significant for gestational diabetes only.

CONCLUSION:

NOx exposure during pregnancy was associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in an area with air pollution levels below current air quality guidelines.

PMID:
23563048
PMCID:
PMC3620758
DOI:
10.1289/ehp.1205736
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center