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Food Chem. 2013 Aug 15;139(1-4):777-85. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.01.077. Epub 2013 Feb 9.

Chemical properties of ω-3 fortified gels made of protein isolate recovered with isoelectric solubilisation/precipitation from whole fish.

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1
Oregon State University, Seafood Research and Education Center, 2001 Marine Dr., Astoria, OR 97103, USA.

Abstract

Protein isolate was recovered from whole gutted fish using isoelectric solubilisation/precipitation (ISP). The objective was to determine chemical properties of heat-set gels made of the ISP protein isolate fortified with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)-rich oils (flaxseed, fish, algae, krill, and blend). The extent of the PUFAs increase, ω-6/ω-3 FAs and unsaturated/saturated FAs ratios, and the indices of thrombogenicity and atherogenicity depended on specific ω-3 PUFAs-rich oil used to fortify protein isolate gels. Lipid oxidation in ω-3 PUFAs fortified gels was minimal, although greater (P<0.05) than control gels (without ω-3 PUFAs fortification). However, all gels were in the slightly rancid, but acceptable range. The commonly used thiobarbituric-acid-reactive-substances (TBARS) assay to determine lipid oxidation in seafood may be inaccurate for samples containing krill oil due to its red pigment, astaxanthin. Protein degradation (total-volatile-basic-nitrogen) was greater (P<0.05) in ω-3 PUFAs fortified gels than control gels. However, all gels were considerably below the acceptability threshold for protein degradation. The shear stress of ω-3 PUFAs fortified gels was generally greater than the control gels and the shear strain was generally unchanged. This study demonstrates that ω-3 PUFAs fortification of protein isolates recovered with ISP from fish processing by-products or whole fish has potential application in the development of functional foods.

PMID:
23561173
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.01.077
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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