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Pain Pract. 2014 Feb;14(2):132-9. doi: 10.1111/papr.12058. Epub 2013 Apr 8.

Effect of a preoperative gabapentin on postoperative analgesia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease following major bowel surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Management, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Postoperative pain management for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be challenging. These patients have a high tolerance to pain medication, and relative contraindications to the use of epidural analgesia, limiting the pain management options. We evaluated the effect of a single preoperative gabapentin dose on opioid consumption for patients with IBD undergoing abdominal surgery. Secondary outcomes were postoperative pain scores, opioid-related side effects, and patient's length of hospital stay.

METHODS:

Following Research Ethics Board approval and informed written consent, patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups receiving either 600 mg of oral gabapentin or placebo 1 hour before the surgery. A blinded anesthesiologist recorded pain scores at rest and movement twice daily for 2 postoperative days. Also recorded were opioid consumption, time of return of bowel function, time to discharge, and opioid-related side effects on the opioid-related symptom distress scale (ORSDS).

RESULTS:

Seventy-two patients completed the study. The difference in opioid consumption (P = 0.4169) and pain scores measured at rest and movement on all 4 postoperative visits was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between gabapentin and placebo on all the 11 symptoms reported on the ORSDS. There was a slight increase in length of hospital stay in the placebo group, but the return of bowel function was similar between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study examined the effect of a single preoperative administration of gabapentin in patients with IBD undergoing major bowel surgery. Our results suggest a single preoperative oral dose of gabapentin 600 mg does not reduce postoperative pain scores, opioid consumption, or opioid-related side effects.

KEYWORDS:

abdominal surgery; acute pain service; gabapentin; pain; patient-controlled intravenous analgesia; postoperative; preoperative administration; randomized controlled trial

PMID:
23560500
DOI:
10.1111/papr.12058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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