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Cell Biochem Biophys. 2013;67(3):911-4. doi: 10.1007/s12013-013-9581-0.

Verapamil reverses myocardial no-reflow after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

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  • 1Department of Cardiology, Xuzhou Cardiovascular Diseases Institute, Xuzhou Hospital Affiliated East South University School of Medicine, No. 199 Jiefang Road, Xuzhou, 221009, China, fuqiang@medmail.com.cn.

Abstract

The present study evaluated the efficacy of intracoronary administration of verapamil to attenuate the no-reflow phenomenon following the primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with the ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). A total of 201 patients with STEMI who underwent primary PCI within 12 h from the beginning of the heart attack were included. The no-reflow phenomenon was defined as substantial coronary anterograde flow of TIMI ≤2. Verapamil (100-200 μg) was injected into coronary artery immediately after no-reflow; the coronary arteriography was repeated later. Hundred and ninety-eight patients with STEMI successfully underwent primary PCI, and 246 stents were implanted with the average of 1.2 stents per patient. No-reflow occurred in 25 out of 198 patients (12.6%). Twenty-one (84%) patients developed the flow of TIMI ≥3 after intracoronary administration of verapamil, as revealed by repeated coronary angiography. Two patients developed transient hypotension which normalized without treatment within 3-5 min. Three patients showed sinus bradycardia, in one patient there was transient II sinoatrial block, and one patient developed type 1 atrioventricular block. All adverse effects were alleviated after intravenous injection of atropine (0.5-1 mg). In conclusion, the no-reflow phenomenon following primary PCI in patients with STEMI is significantly improved by intracoronary administration of verapamil which is useful to reduce cardiovascular events during operation.

PMID:
23559273
DOI:
10.1007/s12013-013-9581-0
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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