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South Med J. 2013 Apr;106(4):267-9. doi: 10.1097/SMJ.0b013e31828d970c.

Lack of preoperative predictors of the immediate return of postoperative bladder emptying after uterosacral ligament suspension.

Author information

1
Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, TX 76508, USA. cchung@sw.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether preoperative postvoid residual volume (PVR), pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POPQ) stage, patient characteristics, or concurrent operations are predictors of immediate postoperative bladder emptying after uterosacral ligament suspension (USLS).

METHODS:

A review of patients undergoing USLS in 2008 and 2009 was performed. The factors analyzed included patient age, body mass index, parity, preoperative PVR, POPQ stage, concurrent anterior repair, posterior repair, hysterectomy and/or sling procedures, and postoperative voiding trial status.

RESULTS:

During the study interval, 151 patients underwent USLS with various combinations of concurrent procedures. The mean preoperative PVR was 90 mL. Seventy-five patients (50%) passed the postoperative voiding trial on postoperative day 1. Patients who passed the postoperative voiding trial and those who failed had similar average preoperative PVR (P = 0.94), similar age (P = 0.14), body mass index (P = 0.45), parity (P = 0.82), and preoperative POPQ stage (P = 0.80). There was no difference (P ≥ 0.14) among concurrent surgical procedures in the proportion of patients who passed the postoperative voiding trial based on univariate analyses.

CONCLUSIONS:

In our cohort of patients, preoperative PVR, POPQ stage, and other patient characteristics were not predictors of immediate postoperative bladder emptying after USLS. Postoperative voiding function is one of the most unpredictable aspects of pelvic reconstructive surgery.

PMID:
23558415
DOI:
10.1097/SMJ.0b013e31828d970c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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