Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Laryngoscope. 2013 Jul;123(7):1704-8. doi: 10.1002/lary.23899. Epub 2013 Apr 2.

The effects of topical anesthetic on swallowing during nasoendoscopy.

Author information

1
Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS:

To assess the effects of a typical otolaryngologic dose of 1 mL of 4% lidocaine on penetration aspiration scale scores and participant discomfort during flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing.

STUDY DESIGN:

A prospective pilot study.

METHODS:

Twenty healthy participants consumed 12 swallows consisting of graduated volumes of milk, water, pudding, and cracker in anesthetized and nonanesthetized conditions. Each participant was randomly selected to begin with the anesthetized or nonanesthetized condition. Each participant returned within 7 days to repeat the study in the other condition. Digital recordings of their evaluations were scored via the penetration-aspiration scale in a blinded fashion. Participants recorded their discomfort and tolerance of each flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing.

RESULTS:

The anesthetized condition yielded significantly worse swallowing function (P = .001) than the nonanesthetized condition. The nonanesthetized condition yielded greater discomfort and pain during the procedure (P = .006, .018), greater pain during insertion and removal of the endoscope (P = .002, .003) and less overall tolerance (P = .016) than the anesthetized condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

A typical otolaryngologic anesthetic dose of 1 mL of 4% lidocaine during flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing predisposed healthy young adults to higher penetration aspiration scale scores (less safe swallowing) than the nonanesthetized condition; however, the anesthetic reduced discomfort and provided better overall tolerance. Future studies need to evaluate the effects of lower doses of lidocaine (0.2 and 0.5 mL) on swallowing function and comfort.

PMID:
23553259
DOI:
10.1002/lary.23899
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center