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Environ Sci Technol. 2013 May 7;47(9):3944-52. doi: 10.1021/es304942e. Epub 2013 Apr 22.

Cleaner cooking solutions to achieve health, climate, and economic cobenefits.

Author information

1
U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC, USA. anenberg.susan@epa.gov

Abstract

Nearly half the world's population must rely on solid fuels such as biomass (wood, charcoal, agricultural residues, and animal dung) and coal for household energy, burning them in inefficient open fires and stoves with inadequate ventilation. Household solid fuel combustion is associated with four million premature deaths annually; contributes to forest degradation, loss of habitat and biodiversity, and climate change; and hinders social and economic progress as women and children spend hours every day collecting fuel. Several recent studies, as well as key emerging national and international efforts, are making progress toward enabling wide-scale household adoption of cleaner and more efficient stoves and fuels. While significant challenges remain, these efforts offer considerable promise to save lives, improve forest sustainability, slow climate change, and empower women around the world.

PMID:
23551030
DOI:
10.1021/es304942e
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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