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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013 May;100(2):257-64. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2013.03.016. Epub 2013 Mar 30.

Family psychological stress early in life and development of type 1 diabetes: the ABIS prospective study.

Author information

1
Div of Pediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Dept of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. maria.nygren@liu.se

Abstract

AIMS:

This study investigated whether psychological stress in the family during the child's first year of life are associated with the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D). According to the beta-cell stress hypothesis all factors that increase the need for, or the resistance to, insulin may be regarded as risk factors for T1D.

METHODS:

Among 8921 children from the general population with questionnaire data from one parent at child's birth and at 1 year of age, 42 cases of T1D were identified up to 11-13 years of age. Additionally 15 cases with multiple diabetes-related autoantibodies were detected in a sub-sample of 2649 children.

RESULTS:

Cox regression analyses showed no significant associations between serious life events (hazard ratio 0.7 for yes vs. no [95% CI 0.2-1.9], p=0.47), parenting stress (0.9 per scale score [0.5-1.7], p=0.79), or parental dissatisfaction (0.6 per scale score [0.3-1.2], p=0.13) during the first year of life and later diagnosis of T1D, after controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, and diabetes-related factors. Inclusion of children with multiple autoantibodies did not alter the results.

CONCLUSIONS:

No association between psychological stress early in life and development of T1D could be confirmed.

PMID:
23549245
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2013.03.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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