Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur Spine J. 2013 Sep;22(9):2030-4. doi: 10.1007/s00586-013-2764-y. Epub 2013 Apr 2.

An increase in height of spinous process is associated with decreased heights of intervertebral disc and vertebral body in the degenerative process of lumbar spine.

Author information

1
Department of Spinal Surgery and Medical Engineering, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie, 514-8507, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Currently degeneration of the intervertebral disc and joint in the degenerative process of the lumbar spine has mainly attracted the attention, however, there are very few literatures focusing on the height of the spinous process. Our objective was to examine in what generation the change in spinous process height occurs and how the change is involved in the degenerative process of the lumbar spine.

METHODS:

CT or CT myelography of 1,015 patients, 536 males and 579 females were measured in 6 items, including the heights of the L4 and L5 vertebral bodies, the L4 and L5 spinous processes, the L4/5 intervertebral disc, and the L5/S1 intervertebral disc. All data of the 6 items were analyzed and compared between gender in 5 age groups (40s, 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s).

RESULTS:

The results indicated a significant increase in the height of the L4 and L5 spinous process (P < 0.01) in the 60- to 70-year-old group for both genders, and also showed that the L4 and L5 vertebral body height was significantly decreased in the 50- to 60-year-old group (P < 0.01 in males, P < 0.001 in females).

CONCLUSIONS:

Changes in the spinous process morphology followed degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc and vertebral body in the degenerative process of the lumbar spine. This result may suggest that the morphological change of an increase in the height of the spinous process may be a kind of biological defense reaction to stabilize the intervertebral portion.

PMID:
23546689
PMCID:
PMC3777063
DOI:
10.1007/s00586-013-2764-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center