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Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2013 Jun;9(6):340-50. doi: 10.1038/nrrheum.2013.43. Epub 2013 Apr 2.

The phenotypic and genetic signatures of common musculoskeletal pain conditions.

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1
Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, Koury Oral Health Sciences Building, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7455, USA. luda@unc.edu

Abstract

Musculoskeletal pain conditions, such as fibromyalgia and low back pain, tend to coexist in affected individuals and are characterized by a report of pain greater than expected based on the results of a standard physical evaluation. The pathophysiology of these conditions is largely unknown, we lack biological markers for accurate diagnosis, and conventional therapeutics have limited effectiveness. Growing evidence suggests that chronic pain conditions are associated with both physical and psychological triggers, which initiate pain amplification and psychological distress; thus, susceptibility is dictated by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Herein, we review phenotypic and genetic markers of common musculoskeletal pain conditions, selected based on their association with musculoskeletal pain in previous research. The phenotypic markers of greatest interest include measures of pain amplification and 'psychological' measures (such as emotional distress, somatic awareness, psychosocial stress and catastrophizing). Genetic polymorphisms reproducibly linked with musculoskeletal pain are found in genes contributing to serotonergic and adrenergic pathways. Elucidation of the biological mechanisms by which these markers contribute to the perception of pain in these patients will enable the development of novel effective drugs and methodologies that permit better diagnoses and approaches to personalized medicine.

PMID:
23545734
PMCID:
PMC3991785
DOI:
10.1038/nrrheum.2013.43
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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