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JAMA Ophthalmol. 2013 Feb;131(2):183-9.

The Detection of Motion by Blind Subjects With the Epiretinal 60-Electrode (Argus II) Retinal Prosthesis.

Author information

1
Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA 91342, USA. jdorn@2-sight.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the ability of 28 blind subjects implanted with a 60-electrode Argus II (Second Sight Medical Products Inc) retinal prosthesis system to detect the direction of a moving object.

METHODS:

Blind subjects (bare light perception or worse in both eyes) with retinitis pigmentosa were implanted with the Argus II prosthesis as part of a phase 1/2 feasibility study at multiple clinical sites worldwide. The experiment measured their ability to detect the direction of motion of a high-contrast moving bar on a flatscreen monitor in 3 conditions: with the prosthesis system on and a 1-to-1 mapping of spatial information, with the system off, and with the system on but with randomly scrambled spatial information.

RESULTS:

Fifteen subjects (54%) were able to perform the task significantly better with their prosthesis system than they were with their residual vision, 2 subjects had significantly better performance with their residual vision, and no difference was found for 11 subjects. Of the 15 better-performing subjects, 11 were available for follow-up testing, and 10 of them had significantly better performance with normal rather than with scrambled spatial information.

CONCLUSIONS:

This work demonstrates that blind subjects implanted with the Argus II retinal prosthesis were able to perform a motion detection task they could not do with their native vision, confirming that electrical stimulation of the retina provides spatial information from synchronized activation of multiple electrodes.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

clinicaltrials.gov Identifier:NCT00407602

PMID:
23544203
PMCID:
PMC3924899
DOI:
10.1001/2013.jamaophthalmol.221
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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