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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Oct;45(10):1956-64. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318293b1ee.

Physical education can improve insulin resistance: the LOOK randomized cluster trial.

Author information

1
1College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, AUSTRALIA; 2Academic Unit of Internal Medicine, Canberra Hospital, Garran, ACT, AUSTRALIA; 3Australian National University, Fenner School of Environment and Society, Canberra, ACT, AUSTRALIA; 4Centre for Research and Action in Public Health, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Bruce, AUSTRALIA; 5School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, AUSTRALIA; and 6Australian National University, Department of Psychology, Canberra, AUSTRALIA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

As impaired glucose metabolism may arise progressively during childhood, we sought to determine whether the introduction of specialist-taught school physical education (PE) based on sound educational principles could improve insulin resistance (IR) in elementary school children.

METHODS:

In this 4-yr cluster-randomized intervention study, participants were 367 boys and 341 girls (mean age = 8.1 yr, SD = 0.35) initially in grade 2 in 29 elementary schools situated in suburbs of similar socioeconomic status. In 13 schools, 100 min·wk-1 of PE, usually conducted by general classroom teachers, was replaced with two classes per week taught by visiting specialist PE teachers; the remaining schools formed the control group. Teacher and pupil behavior were recorded, and measurements in grades 2, 4, and 6 included fasting blood glucose and insulin to calculate the homeostatic model of IR, percent body fat, physical activity, fitness, and pubertal development.

RESULTS:

On average, the intervention PE classes included more fitness work than the control PE classes (7 vs 1 min, P < 0.001) and more moderate physical activity (17 vs 10 min, P < 0.001). With no differences at baseline, by grade 6, the intervention had lowered IR by 14% (95% confidence interval = 1%-31%) in the boys and by 9% (95% confidence interval = 5%-26%) in the girls, and the percentage of children with IR greater than 3, a cutoff point for metabolic risk, was lower in the intervention than the control group (combined, 22% vs 31%, P = 0.03; boys, 12% vs 21%, P = 0.06; girls, 32% vs 40%, P = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Specialist-taught primary school PE improved IR in community-based children, thereby offering a primordial preventative strategy that could be coordinated widely although a school-based approach.

PMID:
23542892
DOI:
10.1249/MSS.0b013e318293b1ee
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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