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Phlebology. 2014 May;29(4):220-6. doi: 10.1177/0268355513480489. Epub 2013 May 6.

Venous leg ulcer in the context of chronic venous disease.

Author information

1
Department of Angiology and Vascular Surgery, IBSAL-Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a frequent disorder with a high socioeconomic impact. Little is known about the possible differences between healed ulcer (C5 group) and active ulcer (C6 group) in terms of disease severity and quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to determine the possible differences in severity disease and QoL between the C5-C6 and C1 (control) group.

METHODS:

Data from a national, multicentre, observational and cross-sectional study (n = 1598) were used to compare three groups of CVD: C1 (n = 243), C5 (n = 136) and C6 (n = 70). CVD severity was assessed with the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and QoL with the Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12) and Chronic Lower Limb Venous Insufficiency Questionnaire (CIVIQ-20).

RESULTS:

Patients with active ulcers had a higher mean total VCSS than patients with healed ulcers (P < 0.05). Both SF-12 and CIVIQ-20 QoL questionnaires indicated a poorer QoL in patients with ulcers than in those with C1 (P < 0.05). Compared with the C5 group, patients with active ulcers (C6) had lower QoL scores, but the differences were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with venous leg ulcers (C5-C6) are associated with high severity and poor QoL. However, the healing of a leg ulcer did not contribute to improvement of QoL.

KEYWORDS:

CEAP classification; CIVIQ Questionnaire; Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12); Venous Clinical Severity Score; chronic venous disease; quality of life; venous ulcer

PMID:
23538963
DOI:
10.1177/0268355513480489
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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