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Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2013;9:327-54. doi: 10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-050212-185526.

Depression and cardiovascular disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. mary.whooley@ucsf.edu

Abstract

During the past two decades, research in the field of depression and cardiovascular disorders has exploded. Multiple studies have demonstrated that depression is more prevalent in populations with cardiovascular disease, is a robust risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease in healthy populations, and is predictive of adverse outcomes (such as myocardial infarction and death) among populations with preexisting cardiovascular disease. Mechanistic studies have shown that poor health behaviors, such as physical inactivity, medication nonadherence, and smoking, strongly contribute to this association. Small randomized trials have found that antidepressant therapies may improve cardiac outcomes. Based on this accumulating evidence, the American Heart Association has recommended routine screening for depression in all patients with coronary heart disease. This review examines the key epidemiological literature on depression and cardiovascular disorders and discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for this association. We also examine current recommendations for screening, diagnosis, and management of depression. We conclude by highlighting new research areas and discussing therapeutic management of depression in patients with cardiovascular disorders.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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