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NeuroRehabilitation. 2013;32(2):233-52. doi: 10.3233/NRE-130841.

Inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury: the influence of age on treatments and outcomes.

Author information

1
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA. marcel.dijkers@mssm.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elderly persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are increasingly admitted to inpatient rehabilitation, but we have limited knowledge of their characteristics, the treatments they receive, and their short-term and medium-term outcomes. This study explored these issues by means of comparisons between age groups.

METHODS:

Data on 1419 patients admitted to 9 inpatient rehabilitation facilities for initial rehabilitation after TBI were collected by means of (1) abstraction from medical records; (2) point-of care forms completed by therapists after each treatment session; and (3) interviews at 3 months and 9 months after discharge, conducted with the patient or a proxy.

RESULTS:

Elderly persons (65 or older) had a lower brain injury severity, and a shorter length of stay (LOS) in acute care. During rehabilitation, they received fewer hours of therapy, due to a shorter LOS and fewer hours of treatment per day, especially from psychology and therapeutic recreation. They regained less functional ability during and after inpatient rehabilitation, and had a very high mortality rate.

CONCLUSIONS:

Elderly people can be rehabilitated successfully, and discharged back to the community. The treatment therapists deliver, and issues surrounding high mortality need further research.

PMID:
23535785
DOI:
10.3233/NRE-130841
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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