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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 May;98(5):1891-900. doi: 10.1210/jc.2012-3695. Epub 2013 Mar 26.

Effects of testosterone and progressive resistance exercise in healthy, highly functioning older men with low-normal testosterone levels.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. kerry.hildreth@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Aging in men is associated with reduced testosterone (T) levels and physiological changes leading to frailty, but the benefits of T supplementation are inconclusive.

OBJECTIVE:

We studied the effects of T supplementation with and without progressive resistance training (PRT) on functional performance, strength, and body composition.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

We recruited 167 generally healthy community-dwelling older men (66 ± 5 years) with low-normal baseline total T levels (200-350 ng/dL).

INTERVENTION:

Subjects were randomized to placebo or transdermal T gel [2 doses targeting either a lower (400-550 ng/dL) or higher (600-1000 ng/dL) T range] and to either PRT or no exercise for 12 months.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

The primary outcome was functional performance, whereas secondary outcomes were strength and body composition.

RESULTS:

A total of 143 men completed the study. At 12 months, total T was 528 ± 287 ng/dL in subjects receiving any T and 287 ± 65 ng/dL in the placebo group. In the PRT group, function and strength were not different between T- and placebo-treated subjects, despite greater improvements in fat mass (P = .04) and fat-free mass (P = .01) with T. In the non-PRT group, T did not improve function but improved fat mass (P = .005), fat-free mass (P = .03), and upper body strength (P = .03) compared with placebo. There were fewer cardiovascular events in the T-treated groups compared with placebo.

CONCLUSIONS:

T supplementation was well tolerated and improved body composition but had no effect on functional performance. T supplementation improved upper body strength only in nonexercisers compared with placebo.

PMID:
23533227
PMCID:
PMC3644594
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2013-2227
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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