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Am J Med Genet A. 2013 May;161A(5):1167-72. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.35847. Epub 2013 Mar 26.

Familial microdeletion of 17q24.3 upstream of SOX9 is associated with isolated Pierre Robin sequence due to position effect.

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1
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA.

Abstract

Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is a malformation pattern characterized by the core triad of retrognathia, glossoptosis, and cleft palate that causes difficulty in glossopharyngeal-laryngeal-vagal functions. The etiology of PRS remains largely unknown; previous reports have suggested that it is caused by intrauterine constriction or external conditions such as oligohydramnios, breech position, or abnormal uterine anatomy. Genetic causes include occurrence as a manifestation of many single gene conditions and chromosomal rearrangements. Positional effect on some loci or genes, including SOX9 has also been posited as a cause. Here, we report on an 18-month-old girl born with isolated PRS. Clinical chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) revealed a maternally inherited ~623 kb microdeletion that is -725 kb upstream of 5' SOX9 at chromosome locus 17q24.3. Her mother had cleft palate. This region, although devoid of any genes, is known to have a position effect on SOX9 due to elimination of highly conserved non-coding cis-regulatory elements. This report supports the evidence that deregulation of an intact SOX9 coding region is a cause of or associated with isolated PRS, and provides further evidence that CMA in the clinical setting is a powerful tool in detecting microdeletions in gene "desert" regions that have pathogenic position effect on specific genes.

PMID:
23532965
DOI:
10.1002/ajmg.a.35847
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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