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Environ Res. 2013 May;123:9-16. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2013.01.006. Epub 2013 Mar 21.

Associations between ambient air pollution and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy.

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1
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exposure to ambient air pollution is linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Previous reports examining the relationship between ambient air pollution and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy have been inconsistent.

OBJECTIVES:

We evaluated the effects of ambient air pollution on the odds of Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy and whether these associations varied by body mass index (BMI).

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective, case-control study among 298 predominantly Hispanic women (136 clinically confirmed cases) who attended the Los Angeles County+University of Southern California Women's and Children's Hospital during 1996-2008. Trimester-specific carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <10 μm and <2.5 μm (PM10, PM2.5) exposure were estimated based on 24-hour exposure level at residential address. Logistic regression models were fitted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for two standard deviation increase in exposure levels.

RESULTS:

Exposures to CO and PM2.5 in the 1st trimester were significantly associated with Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy, and these associations were modified by BMI. In non-obese women (BMI <30), 1st trimester exposures to PM2.5 and CO were significantly associated with increased odds of Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy (ORs per 2-standard deviation increase in PM2.5 (7 μg/m(3)) and CO (1 ppm) exposures were 9.10 [95% CI: 3.33-24.6] and 4.96 [95% CI: 1.85-13.31], respectively). Additionally, there was a significantly positive association between exposure to O3 in the 2nd trimester and Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy (OR per 15 ppb=2.05; 95% CI: 1.22-3.46).

CONCLUSION:

Among non-obese women, 1st trimester exposure to PM2.5 and carbon monoxide are associated with increased odds of Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy.

PMID:
23522615
PMCID:
PMC4539955
DOI:
10.1016/j.envres.2013.01.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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