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Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Jul;471(7):2284-95. doi: 10.1007/s11999-013-2928-4. Epub 2013 Mar 21.

Periarticular injection in knee arthroplasty improves quadriceps function.

Author information

1
Anesthesia Service and Pain Clinic, University Hospital Caremeau, Nîmes, France.

Erratum in

  • Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Jun;471(6):2042.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The postoperative analgesic potential of periarticular anesthetic infiltration (PAI) after TKA is unclear as are the complications of continuous femoral nerve block on quadriceps function.

QUESTIONS/PURPOSES:

We asked (1) whether PAI provides equal or improved postoperative pain control in comparison to a femoral nerve block in patients who have undergone TKA; and (2) if so, whether PAI improves early postoperative quadriceps control and facilitates rehabilitation.

METHODS:

We randomized 60 patients to receive either PAI or femoral nerve block. During the first 5 days after TKA, we compared narcotic consumption, pain control, quadriceps function, walking distance, knee ROM, capacity to perform a straight leg raise, and active knee extension. Medication-related side effects, complications, operating room time, and hospitalization duration were compared.

RESULTS:

Opioid consumption was lower in the PAI group during the first 8 postoperative hours (12.5 mg versus 18.7 mg morphine), as was reported pain at rest (1.7 versus 3.5 on a 10-point VAS). Thereafter, narcotic consumption and reported pain were similar up to 120 hours. More subjects in the femoral nerve block group experienced quadriceps motor block (37% versus 0% in the PAI group). On Days 1 to 3, subjects in the PAI group experienced better capacity to perform the straight leg raise, active knee extension, and had longer walking distances.

CONCLUSIONS:

PAI provided pain control equivalent to that of a femoral nerve block while avoiding a motor block and its negative functional impacts. The data suggest it should be considered an alternative to a femoral nerve block.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level I, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

PMID:
23516031
PMCID:
PMC3676583
DOI:
10.1007/s11999-013-2928-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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