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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Nov;21(11):2350-5. doi: 10.1002/oby.20362. Epub 2013 Jul 2.

High fat diet partially attenuates fermentation responses in rats fed resistant starch from high-amylose maize.

Author information

1
Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The effects of type 2 resistant starch from high-amylose maize (HAM-RS2) in rodents fed with low-fat diets were demonstrated in previous studies. Fish oil is also reported to reduce body fat. In the current study, the effects of high fat and fish oil on HAM-RS2 feeding in rats were investigated.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Rats were fed 0 or 27% (weight) HAM-RS2 with low (15% energy) or high fat (42% energy) diets that included 0 or 10% (energy) tuna oil to test the effect of HAM-RS2 in diet-induced obesity and effects of tuna oil. Data were analyzed as 2 × 2 × 2 factorial.

RESULTS:

Rats fed HAM-RS2 had decreased cecal contents pH, increased cecal and cecal contents weight, increased cecal contents acetate, propionate, and butyrate, increased GLP-1 and PYY, and decreased abdominal fat. However, high fat partially attenuated effects of HAM-RS2, but increased GLP-1 active. Dietary tuna oil had limited effects at concentration used.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results demonstrated that a high fat diet partially attenuates the response to HAM-RS2. The mechanism may center on reduced levels of cecal contents propionate and butyrate and reduced serum PYY. This study demonstrated that with consumption of high fat, HAM-RS2 produces fermentation but results in partial attenuation of effects.

PMID:
23512798
PMCID:
PMC5225625
DOI:
10.1002/oby.20362
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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