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Int Orthop. 2013 Jul;37(7):1355-61. doi: 10.1007/s00264-013-1850-4. Epub 2013 Mar 20.

Temperature control with internally applied cooling in solid material drilling: an experimental, biomechanical study.

Author information

1
Trauma Department Hannover Medical School, MHH, Carl-Neuberg-Street 1, D-30625 Hannover, Germany. brand.stephan@mh-hannover.de

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the different temperature levels while drilling solid materials and to compare different cooling solutions for possible temperature control. An additional purpose was to develop an internal cooling device which can be connected to routinely used manual drilling devices in trauma surgery.

METHODS:

Drilling was performed on a straight hip stem implanted in bovine femora without cooling, with externally applied cooling and with a newly developed internal cooling device. Temperature changes were measured by seven thermocouples arranged near the borehole. Additionally, thermographic scans were performed during drilling.

RESULTS:

Drilling without cooling leads to an immediate increase in temperature to levels of thermal osteonecrosis (over 200 °C). With externally applied cooling temperatures were decreased, but were still up to a tissue damaging 85 °C. Internally applied cooling led to a temperature decrease to tissue-preserving levels during the drilling procedure (24.7 °C).

CONCLUSION:

Internal cooling with HPC-drillers lowered the measured temperatures to non-tissue damaging temperatures and should avoid structural tissue damage.

PMID:
23512602
PMCID:
PMC3685654
DOI:
10.1007/s00264-013-1850-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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