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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Apr 16;61(15):1596-600. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2012.12.045.

Safety and feasibility of robotic percutaneous coronary intervention: PRECISE (Percutaneous Robotically-Enhanced Coronary Intervention) Study.

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1
Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA. gw2128@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety as well as the clinical and technical effectiveness of robotic-assisted percutaneous coronary intervention.

BACKGROUND:

Robotic systems have been suggested to enhance the performance of cardiovascular procedures, as well as to provide protection from the occupational hazards that are associated with interventional practice.

METHODS:

Patients with coronary artery disease and clinical indications for percutaneous intervention were enrolled. The coronary intervention was performed with the CorPath 200 robotic system, which consists of a remote interventional cockpit and a bedside disposable cassette that enables the operator to advance, retract, and rotate guidewires and catheters. The primary endpoints were clinical procedural success, defined as <30% residual stenosis at the completion of the robotic-assisted procedure without major adverse cardiovascular events within 30 days, and device technical success, defined as the successful manipulation of the intracoronary devices using the robotic system only.

RESULTS:

A total of 164 patients were enrolled at 9 sites. Percutaneous coronary intervention was completed successfully without conversion to manual operation, and device technical success was achieved in 162 of 164 patients (98.8%). There were no device-related complications. Clinical procedural success was achieved in 160 of 164 patients (97.6%), whereas 4 (2.4%) had periprocedural non-Q-wave myocardial infarctions. No deaths, strokes, Q-wave myocardial infarctions, or revascularization occurred in the 30 days after the procedures. Radiation exposure for the primary operator was 95.2% lower than the levels found at the traditional table position.

CONCLUSIONS:

This pivotal multicenter study with a robotic-enhanced coronary intervention system demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the system. The robotic remote-control procedure met the expected technical and clinical performance, with significantly lower radiation exposure to the operator. (Evaluation of the Safety and Effectiveness of the CorPath 200 System in Percutaneous Coronary Interventions [PCI] [PRECISE]; NCT01275092).

PMID:
23500318
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2012.12.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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