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Pediatr Rheumatol Online J. 2013 Mar 15;11(1):11. doi: 10.1186/1546-0096-11-11.

Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis (JPsA): juvenile arthritis with psoriasis?

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1
Division of Rheumatology, SickKids Hospital, Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. earl.silverman@sickkids.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Following the introduction of the ILAR criteria for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA) has become a better recognized category within the inflammatory arthritides of childhood.‚ÄČThere are fewer reports describing the characteristics and long-term outcome of patients with JPsA than other subtypes of JIA.The aim of our study was to determine the long-term outcome and clinical course of patients with juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA) and to define subgroups of JPsA.

METHODS:

Clinical records of all patients meeting criteria for JPsA were reviewed and divided into 4 groups depending on their clinical features and onset type. Patient characteristics and clinical features at onset and during follow-up were determined.

RESULTS:

The cohort consisted of 119 patients: 65 with oligoarticular-onset (55%; persistent 44 and extended 21), 34 (29%) with RF(-) and 4 (3%) RF(+) polyarticular and 16 (13%) enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA). At diagnosis patients with ERA were oldest and more commonly male (p=0.001 and =0.01 respectively). Patients with a polyarticular course had more involvement of small joints of the hands and wrist when compared to patients with persistent oligoarticular and ERA (p<0.001) while patients with ERA had more hip and sacroiliac arthritis (p<0.001 for both). Nail changes were seen in 66 patients (57%) and were associated with DIP involvement (p=0.0034).

OUTCOME:

Time to first inactive disease on, but not off, therapy was significantly longer among patients with polyarticular course when compared to oligoarticular and ERA (p=0.016 and p=0.48 respectively). Patients with polyarticular course more frequently had contractures during follow-up than other groups (p=0.01).

CONCLUSION:

The long-term outcome of with JPsA was generally good. Patients with JPsA did not appear to form distinct sub-group of patients but rather resembled JIA patients with onset types without psoriasis.

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