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Br J Cancer. 2013 Apr 16;108(7):1488-94. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2013.108. Epub 2013 Mar 14.

Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 and Notch3 can predict gemcitabine effects in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Kita 15, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDC) is one of the most lethal human carcinomas. Expression patterns of some genes may predict gemcitabine (GEM) treatment efficacy. We examined predictive indicators of survival in GEM-treated patients by quantifying the expression of several genes in pre-treatment endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) samples from patients with PDC.

METHODS:

The expressions of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1), deoxycitidine kinase, ribonucleoside reductase 1, ribonucleoside reductase 2 and Notch3 in EUS-FNA tissue samples from 71 patients with unresectable PDC were quantified using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and examined for correlations with GEM sensitivity.

RESULTS:

The log-rank test detected no significant differences in overall survival between GEM-treated patients with low and high mRNA levels of all genes examined. However, low Notch3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with longer overall survival in a multivariate analysis for survival (P=0.0094). High hENT1 expression level was significantly associated with a longer time to progression (P=0.039). Interaction tests for GEM administration and hENT1 or Notch3 mRNA expression were statistically significant (P=0.0054 and 0.0047, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

hENT1 and Notch3 mRNA expressions in EUS-FNA specimens were the key predictive biomarkers of GEM effect and GEM sensitivity in patients with unresectable PDC.

PMID:
23492684
PMCID:
PMC3629422
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2013.108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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