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Atherosclerosis. 2013 May;228(1):29-35. doi: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2013.02.018. Epub 2013 Feb 24.

Serum total adiponectin level and the risk of cardiovascular disease in general population: a meta-analysis of 17 prospective studies.

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1
State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Many studies have assessed the association between serum adiponectin and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet whether adiponectin is an independent risk factor for CVD remains controversial. We performed a meta-analysis of 17 prospective epidemiologic studies to evaluate this relationship in the general population.

METHODS:

PubMed and Embase databases were searched through June 2012 to identify studies meeting a priori inclusion criteria, in addition to conducting a secondary reference review. Two principle investigators respectively extracted the information with either fixed-effect model or random-effect model to calculate the relationship between adiponectin and the risk of CVD.

RESULTS:

We summarized 17 prospective studies with a total of 23,717 participants. Overall, higher serum adiponectin was related to an increased risk of ischemic stroke: pooled risk ratio (RR) of 1.34 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.06-1.69] with no heterogeneity (Q = 1.23; P = 0.541). Serum adiponectin was not related to coronary heart disease (CHD) or CVD: pooled RR of 0.96 (95% CI: 0.85-1.08) and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.89-1.13), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased serum adiponectin was related to an elevated risk of ischemic stroke, but there was no clear evidence indicating a positive relationship between adiponectin and the risk of CHD or CVD.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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