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JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 May;70(5):490-8. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.87.

Onset timing, thoughts of self-harm, and diagnoses in postpartum women with screen-positive depression findings.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. katherine.wisner@northwestern.edu

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

The period prevalence of depression among women is 21.9% during the first postpartum year; however, questions remain about the value of screening for depression.

OBJECTIVES:

To screen for depression in postpartum women and evaluate positive screen findings to determine the timing of episode onset, rate and intensity of self-harm ideation, and primary and secondary DSM-IV disorders to inform treatment and policy decisions.

DESIGN:

Sequential case series of women who recently gave birth.

SETTING:

Urban academic women's hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

During the maternity hospitalization, women were offered screening at 4 to 6 weeks post partum by telephone. Screen-positive women were invited to undergo psychiatric evaluations in their homes.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES:

A positive screen finding was an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of 10 or higher. Self-harm ideation was assessed on EPDS item 10: "The thought of harming myself has occurred to me" (yes, quite often; sometimes; hardly ever; never). Screen-positive women underwent evaluation with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for Axis I primary and secondary diagnoses.

RESULTS:

Ten thousand mothers underwent screening, with positive findings in 1396 (14.0%); of these, 826 (59.2%) completed the home visits and 147 (10.5%) completed a telephone diagnostic interview. Screen-positive women were more likely to be younger, African American, publicly insured, single, and less well educated. More episodes began post partum (40.1%), followed by during pregnancy (33.4%) and before pregnancy (26.5%). In this population, 19.3% had self-harm ideation. All mothers with the highest intensity of self-harm ideation were identified with the EPDS score of 10 or higher. The most common primary diagnoses were unipolar depressive disorders (68.5%), and almost two-thirds had comorbid anxiety disorders. A striking 22.6% had bipolar disorders.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

The most common diagnosis in screen-positive women was major depressive disorder with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. Strategies to differentiate women with bipolar from unipolar disorders are needed.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00282776.

PMID:
23487258
PMCID:
PMC4440326
DOI:
10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.87
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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