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Am J Infect Control. 2013 Sep;41(9):824-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2012.11.020. Epub 2013 Feb 26.

Prevalence and factors associated with 2009 to 2011 influenza vaccinations at a university medical center.

Author information

1
Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY 10032, USA. kc298@columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Information on the rates and factors associated with influenza vaccinations, although limited, is important because it can inform the development of effective vaccination campaigns in a university medical center setting.

METHODS:

A study was conducted in 2011 to identify individual and organizational level barriers and facilitators to influenza vaccination among clinical and nonclinical personnel (N = 428) from a major university medical center.

RESULTS:

Seventy-one percent of clinical personnel (n = 170) reported pandemic H1N1 vaccination compared with 27% of nonclinical personnel (n = 258), even though vaccine was made widely available to all personnel at no cost. Similarly, disparate rates between clinical and nonclinical personnel were noted for the 2009/2010 seasonal influenza vaccine (82% vs 42%, respectively) and 2010/2011 combination (pandemic plus seasonal) influenza vaccine (73% vs 28%, respectively). Factors associated with pandemic vaccination in nonclinical personnel included the following: high level of influenza-related knowledge, concern regarding influenza contagion, history of previous influenza vaccinations or influenza illness, participation in vaccine-related training, and awareness of the institution's written pandemic plan. For clinicians, past history of seasonal influenza vaccination was associated with pandemic vaccination. For all participants, taking any 1 or more of the 3 influenza vaccines available in 2009 to 2011 was associated with intent to take a hypothetical future novel pandemic vaccine (odds ratio, 6.7; 95% confidence interval: 4.32-10.44; P < .001).

CONCLUSION:

Most of the risk factors associated with lack of vaccination uptake are amenable to organizational strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Employees; Influenza; Medical center; Occupational health; Pandemic; University; Vaccination

PMID:
23485370
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2012.11.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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