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Clin Exp Hypertens. 2013;35(8):607-13. doi: 10.3109/10641963.2013.776568. Epub 2013 Mar 13.

Subcutaneous administration of sodium alginate oligosaccharides prevents salt-induced hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

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1
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Faculty of Home Economics, Kyoritsu Women's University , Tokyo , Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the mechanism of antihypertensive effects of sodium alginate oligosaccharides, which are enzymatic products of high-molecular-weight natural alginate from seaweeds, in Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl S) rats.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Dahl S rats fed a high-salt (4% NaCl) diet were subcutaneously administered sodium alginate oligosaccharides (60 mg/day using a continuous osmotic mini-pump) for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured using the tail-cuff method, and we determined the influence of the alginate treatment on the metabolism of sodium by measuring sodium excretions in the feces and urine.

RESULTS:

SBP increased in an age-dependent manner in the untreated Dahl S rats. Sodium alginate oligosaccharide treatment via the subcutaneous route almost completely abolished salt-induced hypertension in Dahl S rats fed a high-salt diet. The level of fecal or urinary sodium excretion did not significantly change during the treatment period with the alginate oligosaccharides. The reduction in SBP rapidly recovered after cessation of the treatment. Moreover, the level of urinary protein excretion was lower in the treated Dahl S rats than in the untreated rats during the experimental period.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that sodium alginate oligosaccharides attenuate salt-induced hypertension in Dahl S rats not through reducing salt absorption, but probably through a direct action on vascular vessels.

PMID:
23484864
DOI:
10.3109/10641963.2013.776568
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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