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Pediatr Clin North Am. 2013 Apr;60(2):335-49. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2012.12.008.

Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: new prospects for prevention and therapy.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus is the commonest congenital viral infection in the developed world, with an overall prevalence of approximately 0.6%. Approximately 10% of congenitally infected infants have signs and symptoms of disease at birth, and these symptomatic infants have a substantial risk of subsequent neurologic sequelae. These include sensorineural hearing loss, mental retardation, microcephaly, development delay, seizure disorders, and cerebral palsy. Antiviral therapy for children with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection is effective at reducing the risk of long-term disabilities and should be offered to families with affected newborns. An effective preconceptual vaccine against CMV could protect against long-term neurologic sequelae and other disabilities.

PMID:
23481104
PMCID:
PMC3807860
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2012.12.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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