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Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Jul-Aug;57(1):46-53. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2013.02.006. Epub 2013 Mar 9.

Body mass index and disease-specific mortality in an 80-year-old population at the 12-year follow-up.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, Kyushu Dental University, Kitakyushu, Japan. yutaka@kyu-dent.ac.jp

Abstract

Although many investigations examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality, little is known about the possible associations between BMI and disease-specific mortality in very elderly people. Here we evaluated this association in an 80-year-old population. In 1998, 675 residents in Japan's Fukuoka Prefecture participated. They were followed up for 12 years after the baseline examination; 37 subjects (5.5%) were lost to follow-up. The subjects were divided into six groups by their BMI values: <19.5 (most-thin), 19.5 to <21.1 (relatively thin), 21.1 to <22.5 (thin/normal), 22.5 to <23.8 (normal/overweight), 23.8 to <26.0 (relatively obese), ≥26.0 (most-obese). The most-thin group had the highest mortality from all-causes, and from respiratory disease. The normal/overweight group had the lowest overall mortality among the six BMI groups. These associations were found in the men, but not in the women. The most-obese group did not have higher mortality from all-causes or cardiovascular disease compared to the normal/overweight group. Respiratory disease-related mortality was lowest in the most-obese group. No association was found between BMI group and mortality from cancer. In conclusion, in an 80-year-old Japanese population, mortality from all-causes or respiratory disease was highest in the most-lean group (BMI <19.5), and mortality from all-causes or cardiovascular disease was lowest in the group with BMI 22.5 to <23.8.

PMID:
23478161
DOI:
10.1016/j.archger.2013.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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