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J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2014 Mar-Apr;29(2):125-35. doi: 10.1097/HTR.0b013e318286545d.

The effect of environmental barriers on community integration for individuals with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland (Drs Fleming and Nalder and Ms Alves-Stein); Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Queensland Health (Dr Fleming); Occupational Therapy Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital (Dr Fleming); Metro North Hospital and Health Service (Dr Cornwell); and Behavioural Basis of Health program, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University (Dr Cornwell), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe environmental barriers endorsed by individuals with traumatic brain injury during the first 6 months after discharge and determine their effect on community integration.

DESIGN:

Prospective longitudinal study with data collected at predischarge and at 1, 3, and 6 months postdischarge.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred thirty-five individuals with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury discharged from a large metropolitan hospital to a home/community environment.

MEASURES:

Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale; Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors; and Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4.

RESULTS:

Multiple regression analyses indicated that environmental barriers arising during the transition from hospital to home had a negative association with community integration outcomes. Physical barriers were most commonly endorsed, but attitudinal barriers were significantly correlated with relationship changes.

CONCLUSION:

Environmental barriers should be addressed in rehabilitation and considered in policy development for people with traumatic brain injury. Future research on the measurement of environmental barriers is recommended.

PMID:
23474885
DOI:
10.1097/HTR.0b013e318286545d
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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