Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Microbiol. 2013 May;21(5):230-7. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2013.02.003. Epub 2013 Mar 7.

Bacterial contact-dependent growth inhibition.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9625, USA.

Abstract

Bacteria cooperate to form multicellular communities and compete against one another for environmental resources. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of bacterial competition mediated by contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems. Different CDI+ bacteria deploy a variety of toxins to inhibit neighboring cells and protect themselves from autoinhibition by producing specific immunity proteins. The genes encoding CDI toxin-immunity protein pairs appear to be exchanged between cdi loci and are often associated with other toxin-delivery systems in diverse bacterial species. CDI also appears to facilitate cooperative behavior between kin, suggesting that these systems may have other roles beyond competition.

PMID:
23473845
PMCID:
PMC3648609
DOI:
10.1016/j.tim.2013.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center