Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Obes Surg. 2013 Jul;23(7):959-64. doi: 10.1007/s11695-013-0900-8.

Food intolerance after banded gastric bypass without stenosis: aggressive endoscopic dilation avoids reoperation.

Author information

1
Departamento de Cirurgia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Rua Vigário Barreto, 127/802-Graças, 52020-140, Recife, PE, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) controls obesity and comorbidities. However, there is no consensus on ring placement due to its complications. Surgical ring removal has been the standard approach, despite its inherent morbidity risks. Endoscopic dilation with achalasia balloon is a novel and minimally invasive option. We aimed to evaluate safety and efficacy of aggressive dilation as an outpatient procedure to treat food intolerance after banded RYGBP without stenosis; we also analyzed long-term weight regain.

METHODS:

This prospective study included 63 patients presenting with more than four vomiting episodes per week. Therapeutic endoscopy with a 30-mm balloon (Rigiflex®) was performed with radioscopic guidance in the first 16 patients (25.4 %). Four dilation sessions were performed in 12 patients (19 %), three in 14 (22.2 %), two in 24 (38 %), and one in 13 (20.6 %).

RESULTS:

Complete symptom improvement was achieved in 59 patients (93.6 %), partial improvement in 2 (3.2 %), and failure in 2, leading to ring removal by laparotomy. Complications rate was 9.5 %, including three cases of bleeding, two intragastric ring erosions, and one pneumoperitoneum; all treated clinically with no need for reintervention. Mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 42.4 kg/m(2) and postoperative (before endoscopic treatment) BMI was 25.3 kg/m(2). At a mean follow-up of 46.1 months after endoscopic intervention, mean BMI was 27.8 kg/m(2).

CONCLUSIONS:

Aggressive endoscopic dilation for food intolerance is a safe and minimally invasive method that promotes symptom improvement. It avoided reoperation in 96.8 % of patients and led to a low rate of weight regain.

PMID:
23471676
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-013-0900-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Support Center