Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroimage. 2013 Jul 15;75:97-107. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.02.045. Epub 2013 Mar 5.

Training-mediated leftward asymmetries during music processing: a cross-sectional and longitudinal fMRI analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave, Palmer 127, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
2
Medical Faculty AMC-UvA, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Psychology, Boston College, McGuinn Hall, 140 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave, Palmer 127, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address: gschlaug@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Practicing a musical instrument has a profound impact on the structure and function of the human brain. The present fMRI study explored how relative hemispheric asymmetries in task-related activity during music processing (same/different discrimination) are shaped by musical training (quantified as cumulative hours of instrument practice), using both a large (N=84) cross-sectional data set of children and adults, and a smaller (N=20) two time-point longitudinal data set of children tracked over 3 to 5 years. The cross-sectional analysis revealed a significant leftward asymmetry in task-related activation, with peaks in Heschl's gyrus and supramarginal gyrus (SMG). The SMG peak was further characterized by a leftward asymmetry in the partial correlation strength with subjects' cumulative hours of practice, controlling for subjects' age and task performance. This SMG peak was found to exhibit a similar pattern of response in the longitudinal data set (in this case, with subjects' cumulative hours of practice over the course of the study), controlling for age, scan interval, and amount of instrument practice prior to the first scan. This study presents novel insights into the ways musical instrument training shapes task-related asymmetries in neural activity during music processing.

PMID:
23470982
PMCID:
PMC3705762
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.02.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center