Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013 Sep;94(9):1714-20. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2013.02.016. Epub 2013 Mar 1.

Relation between aerobic capacity and walking ability in older adults with a lower-limb amputation.

Author information

1
MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. d.wezenberg@vu.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the relative aerobic load, walking speed, and walking economy of older adults with a lower-limb prosthesis, and to predict the effect of an increased aerobic capacity on their walking ability.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional.

SETTING:

Human motion laboratory at a rehabilitation center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Convenience sample of older adults (n=36) who underwent lower-limb amputation because of vascular deficiency or trauma and able-bodied controls (n=21).

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Peak aerobic capacity and oxygen consumption while walking were determined. The relative aerobic load and walking economy were assessed as a function of walking speed, and a data-based model was constructed to predict the effect of an increased aerobic capacity on walking ability.

RESULTS:

People with a vascular amputation walked at a substantially higher (45.2%) relative aerobic load than people with an amputation because of trauma. The preferred walking speed in both groups of amputees was slower than that of able-bodied controls and below their most economical walking speed. We predicted that a 10% increase in peak aerobic capacity could potentially result in a reduction in the relative aerobic load of 9.1%, an increase in walking speed of 17.3% and 13.9%, and an improvement in the walking economy of 6.8% and 2.9%, for people after a vascular or traumatic amputation, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Current findings corroborate the notion that, especially in people with a vascular amputation, the peak aerobic capacity is an important determinant for walking ability. The data provide quantitative predictions on the effect of aerobic training; however, future research is needed to experimentally confirm these predictions.

KEYWORDS:

Amputation; Artificial limbs; C(pws); PWS; Physical exertion; Physical fitness; Rehabilitation; Walking; energy expenditure while walking (ml·kg(−1)·min(−1)); o(2)peak; o(2rel); o(2walking); oxygen cost (ie, the oxygen consumption per distance traveled at preferred walking speed) (ml·kg(−1)·m(−1)); peak oxygen consumption (ml·kg(−1)·min(−1)); preferred walking speed (m/s); relative aerobic load (eg, as the percentage of available peak oxygen consumption that was used when walking)

PMID:
23466292
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2013.02.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center