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Dig Liver Dis. 2013 Jun;45(6):487-92. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2013.01.018. Epub 2013 Mar 7.

Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy: a new method for quantitative analysis of pit structure in healthy and Crohn's disease patients.

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1
Digestive Diseases Institute, Nantes University Hospital, F-44093, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy enables microscopic examination of the digestive mucosa.

AIMS:

(1) To identify and validate quantitative endomicroscopic criteria for evaluation of the colonic mucosa and (2) to compare these criteria between healthy and Crohn's disease patients in clinical remission.

METHODS:

Six healthy controls and ten Crohn's disease patients in clinical remission were included in this prospective study. Methylene blue-stained biopsies of the right colon and corresponding endomicroscopic images were analyzed. Major axis, minor axis, and major axis/minor axis ratio of crypt lumens were quantified.

RESULTS:

Quantitative assessment was performed on 21 ± 4 crypt lumens per patient. Major axis/minor axis ratio values measured with endomicroscopy or methylene blue-stained biopsies were linearly correlated (r=0.63, p=0.01). All macroscopically inflamed mucosa had values of major axis/minor axis ratio higher than the median of controls. Interestingly, 50% (3/6) of Crohn's disease patients with macroscopically normal mucosa had also a higher ratio than pooled controls. Histological analysis showed that 6/7 patients with major axis/minor axis ratio superior to 1.7 had microscopic inflammation.

CONCLUSION:

Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy allows quantitative analysis of colonic pit structure. Endomicroscopic analysis of major axis/minor axis ratio allows the detection of microscopic residual inflammation with greater accuracy than standard endoscopy in Crohn's disease patients in clinical remission.

PMID:
23466186
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2013.01.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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