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BJU Int. 2013 Jul;112(1):26-31. doi: 10.1111/bju.12029. Epub 2013 Mar 6.

Impact of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing by Dutch general practitioners.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Isala Clinics, Zwolle, the Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the impact of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) publication in 2009 on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level testing by Dutch general practitioners (GPs) in men aged ≥40 years.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Retrospective study with a Dutch insurance company database (containing PSA test claims) and a large district hospital-laboratory database (containing PSA-test results). The difference in primary PSA-testing rate as well as follow-up testing before and after the ERSPC was tested using the chi-square test with statistical significance at P < 0.05.

RESULTS:

Decline in PSA tests 4 months after ERSPC publication, especially for men aged ≥60 years. Primary testing as well as follow-up testing decreased, both for PSA levels of <4 ng/mL as well as for PSA levels of 4-10 ng/mL. Follow-up testing after a PSA level result of >10 ng/mL moderately increased (P = 0.171). Referral to a urologist after a PSA level result of >4 ng/mL decreased slightly after the ERSPC publication (P = 0.044).

CONCLUSIONS:

After the ERSPC publication primary PSA testing as well as follow-up testing decreased. Follow-up testing seemed not to be adequate after an abnormal PSA result. The reasons for this remain unclear.

PMID:
23465178
DOI:
10.1111/bju.12029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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