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Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2013 Apr;14(4):237-48. doi: 10.1038/nrm3542. Epub 2013 Mar 6.

Diversity in the origins of proteostasis networks--a driver for protein function in evolution.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. epowers@scripps.edu

Abstract

Although the sequence of a protein largely determines its function, proteins can adopt different folding states in response to changes in the environment, some of which may be deleterious to the organism. All organisms--Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya--have evolved a protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, network comprising chaperones and folding factors, degradation components, signalling pathways and specialized compartmentalized modules that manage protein folding in response to environmental stimuli and variation. Surveying the origins of proteostasis networks reveals that they have co-evolved with the proteome to regulate the physiological state of the cell, reflecting the unique stresses that different cells or organisms experience, and that they have a key role in driving evolution by closely managing the link between the phenotype and the genotype.

PMID:
23463216
PMCID:
PMC3718298
DOI:
10.1038/nrm3542
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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