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Ann Thorac Surg. 2013 Apr;95(4):1383-9. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2012.12.009. Epub 2013 Feb 22.

Reoperative multivalve surgery in adult congenital heart disease.

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1
Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Repeat operations are common in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) and valve-related procedures are the most frequent indication for intervention. The purpose of this study is to review a single institution's experience with a large number of patients with ACHD undergoing reoperation requiring multivalve intervention.

METHODS:

Data from the most recent repeat median sternotomy of 254 consecutive ACHD patients with simultaneous intervention on 2 or more valves were analyzed. Mean age of 136 (54%) female and 118 (46%) male patients was 37.9 years (range, 18 to 83). Diagnoses were conotruncal anomaly 132 (52%), Ebstein-tricuspid valve 41(16%), pulmonary stenosis and right ventricular outflow tract obstruction 37 (14%), atrioventricular septal defect 22 (9%), and other 22 (9%). It was the second sternotomy in 130 (51%) patients, third in 80 (31%), fourth in 34 (13%), and fifth in 10 (4%).

RESULTS:

Intervention was on 2 valves in 219 patients (86.2%), 3 in 34 patients (13.4%), and 4 in 1 patient (0.4%). The most common valve combination was tricuspid and pulmonary (117, 43%). Early mortality overall was 4.7% (12 of 254) and 2.9% (7 of 239) after elective operation. Potentially modifiable risk factors identified for early mortality were preoperative hematocrit less than 35 (p=0.01), cross-clamp time (p<0.001), and cardiopulmonary bypass time (p<0.001). Late survival was 96%, 89%, and 77% at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Independent risk factors for late mortality were prolonged ventilation (p=0.002), coronary artery disease (p=0.005), and cardiac injury (p=0.018).

CONCLUSIONS:

The need for simultaneous intervention on multiple valves is relatively common in ACHD, particularly with conotruncal anomalies. Prolonged bypass and cross-clamp times, lower hematocrit, and acquired coronary artery disease are significant predictors of adverse outcome. The number or position of valves requiring intervention did not affect early or late survival.

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