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JAMA Pediatr. 2013 May;167(5):414-21. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.36.

Suctioning and length of stay in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis.

Author information

1
Divisions of Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. grant.mussman@cchmc.org

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

Hospitalizations of infants for bronchiolitis are common and costly. Despite the high incidence and resource burden of bronchiolitis, the mainstay of treatment remains supportive care, which frequently includes nasal suctioning.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between suctioning device type and suctioning lapses greater than 4 hours within the first 24 hours after hospital admission on length of stay (LOS) in infants with bronchiolitis.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study. Data were extracted from the electronic health record.

SETTING:

Main hospital and satellite facility of a large quaternary care children's hospital from January 10, 2010, through April 30, 2011.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 740 infants aged 2 to 12 months and hospitalized with bronchiolitis.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Hospital LOS.

RESULTS:

In the multivariable model adjusted for inverse weighting for propensity to receive deep suctioning, increased deep suction as a percentage of suction events was associated with increased LOS with a geometric mean of 1.75 days (95% CI, 1.56-1.95 days) in patients with no deep suction and 2.35 days (2.10-2.62 days) in patients with more than 60% deep suction. An increased number of suctioning lapses was also associated with increased LOS in a dose-dependent manner with a geometric mean of 1.62 days (95% CI, 1.43-1.83 days) in patients with no lapses and 2.64 days (2.30-3.04 days) in patients with 3 or 4 lapses.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

For patients admitted with bronchiolitis, the use of deep suctioning in the first 24 hours after admission and lapses greater than 4 hours between suctioning events were associated with longer LOS.

PMID:
23460088
PMCID:
PMC6291830
DOI:
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.36
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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