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Prim Care Respir J. 2013 Jun;22(2):161-8. doi: 10.4104/pcrj.2013.00017.

Characteristics of patients preferring once-daily controller therapy for asthma and COPD: a retrospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Academic Centre of Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, UK. david@rirl.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patient preference is an important factor when choosing an inhaler device for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

AIMS:

To identify characteristics of patients with asthma or COPD who prefer a once-daily controller medication regimen.

METHODS:

This retrospective observational study used electronic patient records and linked outcomes from patient-completed questionnaires in a primary care database. We compared the characteristics of patients indicating a preference for once-daily therapy with those who were unsure or indicating no preference.

RESULTS:

Of 3,731 patients with asthma, 2,174 (58%) were women; the mean age was 46 years (range 2-94). Of 2,138 patients with COPD, 980 (46%) were women; the mean age was 70 years (range 35-98). Approximately half of the patients in each cohort indicated once-daily preference, one-quarter were unsure, and one-quarter did not prefer once-daily therapy. In patients with asthma or COPD, the preference for once-daily controller medication was significantly associated with poor adherence and higher concerns about medication. In asthma, good control and low self-perceived controller medication need were associated with once-daily preference. By contrast, in COPD, a high self-perceived need for controller medication was associated with once-daily preference. There was no significant relationship between once-daily preference and age, sex, disease severity, or exacerbation history.

CONCLUSIONS:

Understanding patient preferences may help prescribers to individualise therapy better for asthma and COPD.

PMID:
23460035
DOI:
10.4104/pcrj.2013.00017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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