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J Perinatol. 2013 Aug;33(8):642-6. doi: 10.1038/jp.2013.22. Epub 2013 Feb 28.

Neonatal Critical Care Communication (NC3): training NICU physicians and nurse practitioners.

Author information

1
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Baltimore, MD, USA. rboss1@jhmi.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Communicating with families is a core skill for neonatal clinicians, yet formal communication training rarely occurs. This study examined the impact of an intensive interprofessional communication training for neonatology fellows and nurse practitioners.

STUDY DESIGN:

Evidence-based, interactive training for common communication challenges in neonatology incorporated didactic sessions, role-plays and reflective exercises. Participants completed surveys before, after, and one month following the training.

RESULT:

Five neonatology fellows and eight nurse practitioners participated (n=13). Before the training, participants overall felt somewhat prepared (2.6 on 5 point Likert-type scale) to engage in core communication challenges; afterwards, participants overall felt very well prepared (4.5 on Likert-type scale) (P<0.05). One month later, participants reported frequently practicing the taught skills and felt quite willing to engage in difficult conversations.

CONCLUSION:

An intensive communication training program increased neonatology clinicians' self-perceived competence to face communication challenges which commonly occur, but for which training is rarely provided.

PMID:
23448940
DOI:
10.1038/jp.2013.22
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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