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Plast Surg Nurs. 2013 Jan-Mar;33(1):38-42; quiz 43-4. doi: 10.1097/PSN.0b013e31828425db.

Optimizing the closed suction surgical drainage system.

Author information

1
University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Closed suction drains are indicated in a wide array of postoperative settings, with many distinct drainage systems available to the surgeon. The purpose of this study was to compare the suction gradients achieved using 2 different sizes of suction reservoirs and 2 different techniques for generating negative pressure.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Drainage reservoirs of 100 and 400 ml were chosen to evaluate their ability to achieve suction. Suction was established in both sizes of drains by pressing the sides of the reservoir together or by pushing the bottom of the reservoir toward the top. Negative pressures were recorded with the reservoir empty, and after every 10-ml addition of saline. Averages were graphed to illustrate the applied suction over a range of drain volumes.

RESULTS:

The 100-ml drainage system reached a peak suction of -117.6 mmHg, while the 400-ml drainage system reached only a peak suction of -71.4 mmHg. Both of the maximum suction readings were achieved using the full-squeeze technique. The bottom-pushed-in technique did not result in any sustained measurable levels of suction using either of the reservoir volumes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Smaller drain reservoirs are more successful in generating a high initial suction than larger reservoirs, especially when the volume of fluid in the drain is relatively low. In all sizes of drains, compressing the sides of the reservoir is a far better technique for establishing negative pressure than pressing the bottom of the drain up toward the top.

PMID:
23446508
DOI:
10.1097/PSN.0b013e31828425db
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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