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Nature. 2013 Mar 7;495(7439):85-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11891. Epub 2013 Feb 27.

Low-temperature aqueous-phase methanol dehydrogenation to hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

Author information

1
Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse Eingetragener Verein an der Universität Rostock, Albert-Einstein Straße 29a, Rostock, 18059, Germany.

Abstract

Hydrogen produced from renewable resources is a promising potential source of clean energy. With the help of low-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, molecular hydrogen can be converted efficiently to produce electricity. The implementation of sustainable hydrogen production and subsequent hydrogen conversion to energy is called "hydrogen economy". Unfortunately, its physical properties make the transport and handling of hydrogen gas difficult. To overcome this, methanol can be used as a material for the storage of hydrogen, because it is a liquid at room temperature and contains 12.6 per cent hydrogen. However, the state-of-the-art method for the production of hydrogen from methanol (methanol reforming) is conducted at high temperatures (over 200 degrees Celsius) and high pressures (25-50 bar), which limits its potential applications. Here we describe an efficient low-temperature aqueous-phase methanol dehydrogenation process, which is facilitated by ruthenium complexes. Hydrogen generation by this method proceeds at 65-95 degrees Celsius and ambient pressure with excellent catalyst turnover frequencies (4,700 per hour) and turnover numbers (exceeding 350,000). This would make the delivery of hydrogen on mobile devices--and hence the use of methanol as a practical hydrogen carrier--feasible.

PMID:
23446345
DOI:
10.1038/nature11891

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